Friday, 24 December 2010

See you next year...

Tabloid Watch is taking a short break for Winterv...sorry, Christmas.

Huge thanks to everyone who has read the blog, left a comment, emailed with a suggestion, shared ideas, offered support, followed me on Twitter, re-tweeted a thought or shared a post. It really is appreciated.

While I re-charge my batteries, I highly recommend Kevin Arscott's essay 'The Winterval Myth' which clearly sets out what Winterval was and, more importantly, what it wasn't. As if to prove the point, Primly Stable has posted this picture, from the Birmingham Post, showing Christmas was never banned and replaced by Winterval:


Take care everyone.

Here's Charles Brown
.

4 comments:

  1. I've been reading for nearly a year now, and I appreciate the work you put into all this. Keep it up.

    ReplyDelete
  2. keep up the good work.

    Hope you have a great christmas.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Birmingham City Council did try to airbrush out the word Christmas from it's official celebrations in 1998.

    Though there are some people who are trying to blame others ie Daily Mail, for the bad publicity that the council received following the winterval fiasco.

    What your trying to argue is that the council failed to admit that they rebranded Christmas to avoid offending non-Christians. the council very quickly back tracked a public out cry. But the question remains why Birmingham council decided to rebrand Christmas if not to remove the Christian element.

    http://blogs.birminghampost.net/news/2008/10/why-winterval-fiasco-continues.html

    ReplyDelete
  4. Anonymous (19:50) - So they airbrushed out the word Christmas by writing 'Christmas in Birmingham' at the top of their Winterval posters?

    For the nth time - they did not rebrand (or try to rebrand) Christmas as Winterval. Read the Winterval Myth essay (linked to above) and see why that's simply not true.

    As for the link you provide - the comments are far better than the article.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for taking the time to leave a comment.

Comments are moderated - generally to filter out spam and comments wishing death on people - but other messages will be approved as quickly as possible.