Wednesday, 31 March 2010

What you shouldn't say on the front page of a newspaper...

From the Irish Daily Star:


(Hat-tip to Nicolas Chinardet and rjakesuk)

15 comments:

  1. Wow! Not a lot you can say to that!

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  2. This is surely the moment when a newspaper stops being a newspaper and just becomes a sordid piece of mob-mentality propaganda.

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  3. No doubt that's another paper that complains of the moral decay of society.

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  4. Huh - I thought the german "Bild" to be rude and agitational, but this one is really unbelievable.

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  5. I'm sorry, I don't know those two men, because I'm from Germany. Could anyone explain to me what they did to deserve death?

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  6. Saw that yesterday in a supermarket here (in Ireland) and thought the same. They definitely crossed a border there, although many Irish might in fact think that about their politicians (since many of them are corrupt).

    Still, to write it in front of a newspaper... thats way beyond anything. Being a German myself I also think that even Bild wouldn't do that.

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  7. @maraizen: These are Irish Jo Ackermanns...
    ;-)

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  8. Google ist Dein Freund, maraizen:

    http://www.insideview.ie/irisheyes/2010/03/they-deserve-to-be-shot.html

    Funny that they apparently took the headline from a blogger. It's as if they printed out the Internet.

    Print is dead.

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  9. wow, that´s unbelievable...

    i thought our austrian papers are sometimes extreme, but this is...

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  10. I guess Irish journalists like to be even less subtle than our own.

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  11. Incitement to murder, anyone?

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  12. very subliminal...

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  13. just because they deserve to be shot doesn't make it right to print so. :)

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  14. Rather late to the party here but "he should be shot" is a common piece of Irish hyperbole. I know, I'm Irish, I say it all the time and have been pulled for saying to by English people (who I find a bit prissy on the matter, it's a figure of speech and a literal exhortation). If you think about it for, oh say ten seconds, it'll become clear why we might use such colourful language having enjoyed, in the last century, a revolution and war against Britain, a civil war and whatever you want to call the conflict from 1969 onwards. Quite a lot of people were shot. It's gallows humour.

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